5 Steps to Start a Group at your High School

Start a pro-life group at your school to be a voice for the unborn and to provide pregnancy, parenting and post-abortive healing resources.

1. Recruit students to start the group. If you already know some pro-lifers at your school, this might be a pretty easy step. If not, your recruitment effort should take a few different forms. Posting flyers (click here to learn how to flyer) is probably the least effective method of recruitment, so focus on other methods first. Networking with other student organizations such as religious or political groups that will likely have pro-life students is a good place to start. Tabling and clipboarding (click here to learn how to table) involve approaching students with a sign-up sheet, asking if they are pro-life and getting them to sign up if they are. The “SFLA Recruitment Guide” is a much more comprehensive guide for recruiting students to your group, and can be found here.

2. Prepare for your first meeting. Download and review the SFLA sample mission statement and sample constitution. Edit both documents as needed to suit your group. Bring copies of both the mission statement and the constitution to the first meeting for the others to review. Look up the requirements for becoming an official or recognized student organization at your school. This probably involves submitting a list of student members, a mission statement, and a constitution. Check out SFLA’s Guide for How to Run Effective Meetings here.

3. Approve your name and governing documents. At your first meeting, decide on a name and a mission. Make your mission statement specific and meaningful. Does your group exist solely to end abortion? Do you take a position on embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia, assisted suicide, the death penalty, or chastity? The constitution is important in determining how your group will function. Review it as a group, make any necessary changes, and then vote to approve it.

4. Appoint leadership and file for school recognition. While you may choose to elect future generations of leaders, it generally works best to appoint the first leaders. You and any others working to get the group started should be the leaders. Go over the requirements for school recognition of your group and assign someone to take care of that task. At most schools it is a necessity to find a teacher or faculty member who will sponsor your group.

5. Plan for your first group activity. School approval is sometimes a slow process, so plan your first event off school grounds or make it one that you won’t need official recognition for. For example, do a diaper drive at a business or a car wash to benefit a local pregnancy resource center. Check out the SFLA event guides for more help with these activities and ideas for more. Decide on an event, plan out what tasks are required, and then assign each person a role in making the event happen.

Remember, you have the right to have a group at your school. If you have trouble with your school administration, please contact SFLA for legal help.